Effect of Acute Posttrauma Propranolol on PTSD

Effect of Acute Posttrauma Propranolol on PTSD Outcome and Physiological Responses During Script-Driven Imagery

In this randomized, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy of propranolol in reducing the development of PTSD, Hoge and collegues optimized dosages and conducted both psychophysiological and clinical assessments 1 and 3 months after the traumatic event. Physiological reactivity during script-driven traumatic imagery, severity of PTSD symptoms, and the rate of the PTSD diagnostic outcome were not significantly different between the placebo and the propranolol group. However, post hoc subgroup analyses showed that in participants with high drug adherence, at the 5-week posttrauma assessment, physiological reactivity was significantly lower during script-driven imagery in the propranolol than in the placebo subjects. The autohrs conclude that the physiological results provide some limited support for a model of PTSD in which a traumatic conditioned response is reduced by posttrauma propranolol. However, the clinical results from this study do not support the preventive use of propranolol in the acute aftermath of a traumatic event.

 

Hoge, E. A., Worthington, J. J., Nagurney, J. T., Chang, Y., Kay, E. B., Feterowski, C. M., … Pitman, R. K. (2012). Effect of Acute Posttrauma Propranolol on PTSD Outcome and Physiological Responses During Script-Driven Imagery. CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics, 18, 21–27. doi:10.1111/j.1755-5949.2010.00227.x